UAE hospitals set to operate 3-D printing

DUBAI // Is your hip giving you trouble, maybe you need a liver transplant, or perhaps you’re wondering what you’d look like with a new nose? Doctors in the UAE could soon be creating new organs, body parts and more at the press of a button using the latest in 3-D printing technology. Although the […]

DUBAI // Is your hip giving you trouble, maybe you need a liver transplant, or perhaps you’re wondering what you’d look like with a new nose?

Doctors in the UAE could soon be creating new organs, body parts and more at the press of a button using the latest in 3-D printing technology.

Although the technology has yet to establish itself in the region, exhibitors at Arab Health 2016 are confident that it is only a matter of time before the machines, which can synthesise a perfect, working replica of any three-dimensional object, are commonplace in hospitals across the country.

“We are using 3-D technology to create implants for patients in specific cases. We get the data from the doctor to create tailored implants,” said Mohammed Taiseer, sales manager at Maptec, a 3-D solutions company that displayed various organs, including hearts, for curious visitors to its stall.

“We create models of faces from plastic for cosmetic surgery so people who opt for surgery can know what they will look like after the surgery. We are trying to show people how we can employ the 3-D printer in the field of health care and medicine.”

Although 3-D medical printing is still in the early stages, Mr Taiseer said he expected the technology and its uses to expand in the near future.

“It is used worldwide. I think there is potential for this.”

Spectators were treated to demonstrations of different body parts – including a liver, hip and even a face – being created on a 3-D printer at the exhibition’s 3-D medical printing zone.

Creating artificial 3-D organs allows doctors to practice carrying out complicated operations, such as heart surgeries, before treating real patients, said Luca Vicentini, a cardiovascular engineer.

“Our surgeon, or interventional cardiologist, really likes in the case of new trials to test and perform implantation before the real implantation. They can try to implant in different places and at different levels. They use this to do their trial.

“We have found this very useful in cardiovascular surgeries,” said Mr Vicentini, who was manning a booth by University and Research Hospitals of Italy.

arizvi2@thenational.ae

Source: uae news

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *