Sharjah rolls out measures to reform car repair industry

SHARJAH // Regulations to protect car maintenance workshops and their customers will be introduced in Sharjah by the end of the year. A card system also aims to reduce the number of complaints to Sharjah’s consumer protection department. Customers and workshops have to fill out the maintenance card with information about the work needed for […]

SHARJAH // Regulations to protect car maintenance workshops and their customers will be introduced in Sharjah by the end of the year.

A card system also aims to reduce the number of complaints to Sharjah’s consumer protection department.

Customers and workshops have to fill out the maintenance card with information about the work needed for the vehicle, its condition on its arrival at the workshop, a cost estimate for the work to be done and other details.

According to the department’s statistics, 24 per cent of 862 complaints received in the first quarter this year were related to cars and spare parts.

Salim Al Suwaidi, deputy director of the commercial control and protection department, said the initiative would reduce communication problems and verbal contracts between the customer and workshops.

“It will be similar to the idea of a maintenance book that you receive from the auto dealership when you purchase a new car,” he said.

The department has started a campaign to inform workshops about the new regulations.

Customers welcomed the plan, saying it would reduce fraud. “Several times I have been [getting]lousy work from mechanics,” said Rami Mohammed, 27. “The cost would rise, the work done would be incomplete or wrong, and I have to revisit the shop for more work and pay more money.

“I think if this is enforced correctly, our minds would be at ease, and the risk of getting billed for bad maintenance or unnecessary work will be minimal.”

Workshop owners also welcomed the move.

“Sometimes we get into trouble with customers,” said Ghafir Nooraldeen, a Pakistani mechanic in industrial area 12.

“They say they want to fix an item and choose the spare parts themselves.

“When they come back for their car, they deny requesting those specific parts and do not pay, which sometimes escalates to a fight that ends up at the police station.

“Having a written contract would mean each party would know what his obligations are.”

In the meantime, Mr Al Suwaidi urged residents to get invoices for maintenance work that detailing the work carried out and guarantees on parts.

He said any workshop that failed to provide such invoices should be reported.

tzriqat@thenational.ae

Source: uae news

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *