Peace and the poor are focus of UAE's faithful this Ramadan

DUBAI // Away from the beauty and sheer scale of Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Muslims across the country were praying in mosques large and small on the first day of Ramadan. One of the largest in Dubai is Al Farooq Omar bin Khattab Mosque in Jumeirah, which holds 2,000 worshippers, while Al Rashidiya Grand Mosque […]

DUBAI // Away from the beauty and sheer scale of Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Muslims across the country were praying in mosques large and small on the first day of Ramadan.

One of the largest in Dubai is Al Farooq Omar bin Khattab Mosque in Jumeirah, which holds 2,000 worshippers, while Al Rashidiya Grand Mosque – which was built under the orders of the late Ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum – is a popular place for the faithful every holy month.

Emirati Arwa Hazza, a Dubai Municipality employee, attends Al Rashidiya Grand Mosque for Taraweeh prayers.

“I like going there because they sometimes get well-known imams from different countries. It is a beautiful feeling every year during the holy month,” she said.

“It is a time to remember the poor and less fortunate, and an [opportunity] for the family to get together every day. I hope that this year will be good for the Islamic nations and that peace will prevail in all Arab countries.”

In Sharjah, Ahmad Al Tunaiji woke for Fajr prayers at Ammar bin Yasser Mosque in Al Dhaid, also known as “the big mosque”.

“I attended the prayers with my 11-year-old son to begin the peaceful and holy month of Ramadan. The morning prayers were attended by many of the town residents and we exchanged Ramadan greetings,” said the 42-year-old Emirati.

Egyptian Khalid Assad and his brother Mansour, who arrived in the UAE last week, prayed in the morning at home in Sharjah city. They will be observing Taraweeh in separate mosques.

“Standing side-by-side with people from all walks of life inside the mosque reminds me that, with all our differences, we stand shoulder-to-shoulder and worship our God together,” said 33-year-old Khalid of Al Qasimiya.

In Ras Al Khaimah, Adamu Suaibou, a receptionist from Cameroon, was pleased to have his health this Ramadan.

“I am excited that I have a chance this year to worship during Ramadan 2016 because we lost many people who were with us last Ramadan and others are sick at hospitals,” said the 22-year-old, who has lived in the emirate for two years.

Mr Suaibou visited a local mosque for Farj prayers on Monday, spending some time there reading the Quran before going to work. “I prayed in a mosque in my neighbourhood, Al Juwais, and it was crowded compared to other times.”

Omar Ahmad, a Palestinian human resources executive, did not have time to go home to Ajman for Taraweeh prayers last night as he worked late.

He said he enjoyed the spirit of the holy month in iftar tents and at family gatherings.

“The most astonishing thing in Ramadan is the word ‘Ameen’, when all worshippers say it at the same time regardless of their nationalities, ages and ethnicities.”

Kamel Yousef, a Jordanian businessman, offered prayers at a mosque beside his house in Al Suwan, Ajman.

“The mosque was crowded with happy worshippers who wished a blessed Ramadan for each other, even though they didn’t know each other,” said the 45-year-old.

“Since they announced yesterday that Ramadan had started, I feel that all people have become calm and happy with a smile on their faces.”

On the east coast, Sahar Ali, a 42-year-old Egyptian mother of four, shared Ramadan’s start with neighbours.

“We gathered after Isha prayers last night and went to the Martyr’s Mosque to participate in Taraweeh prayers.” She said that she enjoyed taking part in prayers with 10 other ladies from her neighbourhood as they feel they can be closer to God and feel the Ramadan spirit.

newsdesk@thenational.ae

Source: uae news

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