Our top international arts picks this week: Egyptian temples come to life with video projections

Warhol’s shadows come into the light Andy Warhol is renowned for his pop art takes on Elvis Presley and Marilyn Monroe. But this exhibition in Bilbao features his silk-screen canvas paintings from the late 1970s. Warhol was 50 when he started the project and was not impressed at the time, writing in his diary: “The […]

Warhol’s shadows come into the light

Andy Warhol is renowned for his pop art takes on Elvis Presley and Marilyn Monroe. But this exhibition in Bilbao features his silk-screen canvas paintings from the late 1970s. Warhol was 50 when he started the project and was not impressed at the time, writing in his diary: “The show only looks good because it’s so big.” While the abstract works are more subdued than his pop art classics, they still feature bright and vibrant colours. Warhol completed 102 of the pieces and all are on display at the Guggenheim. Andy Warhol: Shadows runs at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao until October 2. For more information visit www.guggenheim.org/bilbao.

The world of Turkish international schools

The impact of Turkish international schools in more than 100 countries is the subject of this multimedia exhibition in Moscow. Köken Ergun travelled to Kenya and Indonesia, documenting the “Turkish Olympics” – an annual event where pupils compete in Turkish folklore, poetry and song competitions. The final is held in Turkey and Ergun captures a world similar to the World’s Fair, including a fairground with stands from different countries. The schools proliferated under a movement led by Fethullah Gülen to promote inter-faith dialogue, but some critics question its motives. Young Turks runs at the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art until March 26. For more information visit www.garagemca.org.

Glory of Egyptian temples brought back to life

The Temple of Dendur is an ancient Egyptian sandstone structure that has resided in New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art since the 1960s. Many of these temples had detailed reliefs and were also originally painted in vivid colours. But time and exposure to the weather has not been kind and has rubbed much of the colour off. However, a section of the temple has been restored to what it might have looked like in antiquity, thanks to a light projection initiative. The emperor appears as a tan figure, while the deities are rendered in white and striking blue. Colour the Temple marks the first time the Met has experimented with digital projection. It continues at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until March 19.

Source: art & life

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