Our top book picks this week: a look at Rio de Janeiro ahead of the Olympics

newslide Rio de Janeiro by Luiz Eduardo Soares Soares is an award-winning novelist and an ex-government minister from Rio. Here, he tells the story of this year’s Olympic host city from the beaches to the favelas through the lives of workers, police, gangsters and many more. (Penguin, May 5) newslide The Theoretical Foot by M […]

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Rio de Janeiro by Luiz Eduardo Soares

Soares is an award-winning novelist and an ex-government minister from Rio. Here, he tells the story of this year’s Olympic host city from the beaches to the favelas through the lives of workers, police, gangsters and many more. (Penguin, May 5)

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The Theoretical Foot by M F K Fisher

A couple hitchhike across Europe during the late 1930s. But as the long hot summer draws to an end, Susan and Joe glimpse a dark future of brutal war, Nazism and fleeing refugees. Posthumously published tale from a distinguished American food writer. (Bloomsbury Publishing, May 19)

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Girls on Fire by Robin Wasserman

Hannah is a nobody and is regularly bullied by mean girl Nikki. But Nikki’s jock boyfriend shoots himself, which brings Hannah and a new friend, Lacey, together. The pair then narrate their personal rebellion against society – this is being compared to The Virgin Suicides in is portrayal of female youth. (Little Brown, May 5)

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Nothing on Earth by Conor O’Callaghan

In the wake of a financial crash, young people are leaving in droves and dozens of abandoned estates blight the country. A frightened girl with words burnt on her flesh bangs on a door – who will believe her story? The acclaimed Irish writer Donal Ryan has called this debut “beautiful and quietly terrifying”.(Doubleday Ireland, May 19)

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Soccermatics by David Sumpter

What is the similarity between an ant colony and total football? How is the Barcelona midfield geometrically linked? What can defenders learn from lionesses? Sumpter, a maths professor, shows how statistics shape the beautiful game. (Bloomsbury Sigma, May 5)

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Why We Love Music by John Powell

Listening to a piece of music can transport you to a specific time and place. This examines the link between emotions and music and also includes case studies, such as why shoppers spend more money in shops that play classical pieces. (John Murray,May 5)

Source: art & life

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