Our top art picks this week: a new take on Gandhi's letter to Hitler

In 1939 when Adolf Hitler was about to wreak devastation across Europe, Mahatma Gandhi wrote him a letter. He addressed it “Dear Friend” and urged the dictator to step back from the abyss for “the sake of humanity”. Now artist Jitish Kallat has created an installation where the contents of the letter are beamed onto […]

In 1939 when Adolf Hitler was about to wreak devastation across Europe, Mahatma Gandhi wrote him a letter. He addressed it “Dear Friend” and urged the dictator to step back from the abyss for “the sake of humanity”. Now artist Jitish Kallat has created an installation where the contents of the letter are beamed onto a wall of fog in a dark room. Kallat has described the letter as a haiku – a plea from one of the world’s greatest peace advocates to one of its bloodiest tyrants. Jitish Kallat: Covering Letter runs at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya in Mumbai until February 28. For more information visit www.csmvs.in

The surreal world of the ‘devil’s painter’

Hieronymus Bosch has been described as the “devil’s painter” – his works depict a surreal world of monsters, nightmares and hallucinations. Bosch combined reality and fantasy and was one of the most gifted artists of the late Middle Ages. His influence can be seen in the works of Salvador Dali, Joan Miró and Max Ernst. This exhibition in the Netherlands marks the 500th anniversary of his death. Twenty of the painter’s 25 surviving panels will be on display, including The Haywain. Hieronymus Bosch – Visions of Genius runs at the Het Noordbrabants Museum from February 13 to May 8. For more information visit www.boschexpo.hetnoordbrabantsmuseum.nl

Two painters in the Middle East and North Africa

Paul Klee and Ivan Aguéli never met. But both artists travelled to the Middle East and Africa. These trips had a profound affect on their styles: it was in Tunisia that Swiss-born Klee found his calling to be an artist, while Aguéli painted works inspired by architecture he found in Egypt. Aguéli, from Sweden, was particularly taken with the life and culture in Egypt and converted to Islam in 1898. He also studied Sufism. Now this exhibition in Sweden places their work alongside more than 80 pieces. Klee/Aguéli runs at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm until April 24. For more information visit www.modernamuseet.se

Source: art & life

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