Our top art events this week: Shakespeare in Lebanon and the Lahore Literary Festival

A Shakespearean winter comes to Lebanon This winter’s classical music festival in Lebanon is themed “Midwinter Night’s Dream” and many of the performances are Shakespearean. Soprano Hye-Youn Lee, for example, is set to lead a concert featuring Giuseppe Verdi and Gioachino Rossini’s versions of Othello, while actors Mireille Maalouf and Rifaat Torbey will perform excerpts […]

A Shakespearean winter comes to Lebanon

This winter’s classical music festival in Lebanon is themed “Midwinter Night’s Dream” and many of the performances are Shakespearean. Soprano Hye-Youn Lee, for example, is set to lead a concert featuring Giuseppe Verdi and Gioachino Rossini’s versions of Othello, while actors Mireille Maalouf and Rifaat Torbey will perform excerpts of Shakespeare in Arabic. The festival was founded in 1994 with the aim of reviving the city’s cultural life after the dark years of civil war, and now features chamber music, opera, choral concerts, dance and theatre. The Al Bustan Festival takes place in Beit Meri until March 20. For more information visit www.albustanfestival.com

Learn about Urdu mystery novels in Lahore

The Lahore Literary Festival is now in its fourth year and aims to celebrate the rich and diverse traditions of the city. The event includes talks, performances and screenings, along with regular author interviews. Among the many interesting events taking place this year are talks on David Bowie and a look at Urdu mystery novels. Celebrated food writer Madhur Jaffrey, who took curry global, will share her stories of more than 40 years of researching food, while Mohsin Hamid, the Pakistani author of the bestseller How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia will also be appearing. The festival takes place on Saturday and Sunday. For more information visit www.lahorelitfest.com

The enduring legacy of Yugoslavian art

The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, as it was officially known, ceased to exist in 1992. But its artistic legacy remains strong. This exhibition in the UK brings together 30 artists and groups from the so-called “golden age” of Yugoslavia from the early 1960s to the 1980s. Unlike its Communist neighbours, the country had relatively few restrictions on travel. Artists, therefore, were exposed to fresh ideas and they drew on Pop Art, punk music and “Black Wave” films to critique the ruling system. About 100 artefacts and artworks are on display. Monuments Should Not be Trusted runs at the Nottingham Contemporary until March 4. For more information visit www.nottinghamcontemporary.org

Source: art & life

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