Album review: With Gore the Deftones find the strength to go on

Gore Deftones (Reprise) Four stars What happens during the mourning of a close friend? For the Deftones, the answer is Gore, the Californian metallers’ first album since their bassist Chi Cheng died in 2013. But it isn’t a straightforward wake: the car accident from which he would never recover occurred in 2008, and this is […]

Gore

Deftones

(Reprise)

Four stars

What happens during the mourning of a close friend? For the Deftones, the answer is Gore, the Californian metallers’ first album since their bassist Chi Cheng died in 2013. But it isn’t a straightforward wake: the car accident from which he would never recover occurred in 2008, and this is already their third full-length without him.

Emotionally, Gore is as darkly moody as you might expect, yet doesn’t feel like a funeral; rather that they’re steadying themselves after a five-year limbo, gathering enough strength to go on.

From the opener, Prayers/Triangles, there’s a dominating subtlety – their frontman, Chino Moreno, relies on his semi-harmonious croon more than his fearsome scream.

Trademark discordant riffs are more sparingly applied than ever, too – only Doomed User and the title track truly turn up amplifiers to maximum for any extended period, and it’s no coincidence that they’re visceral peaks.

Jerry Cantrell from Alice in Chains – a band also closely acquainted with death – contributes guitar to the mid-paced penultimate track, Phantom Bride, and it’s indicative of Gore’s measured effect. File under: slow burner.

aworkman@thenational.ae

Source: art & life

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *