Album review: Steven Tyler's debut country album plays to his strengths

We’re All Somebody from Somewhere Steven Tyler (Dot/Big Machine) Two and a half stars There are those who see the ­Aerosmith veteran’s ­embrace of Nashville as a ­desperate attempt to stay relevant. Those naysayers would be wrong. We’re All Somebody from Somewhere – Tyler’s first solo album – plays to his strengths: inventive melodies, ­angelic […]

We’re All Somebody from Somewhere

Steven Tyler

(Dot/Big Machine)

Two and a half stars

There are those who see the ­Aerosmith veteran’s ­embrace of Nashville as a ­desperate attempt to stay relevant. Those naysayers would be wrong. We’re All Somebody from Somewhere – Tyler’s first solo album – plays to his strengths: inventive melodies, ­angelic harmonies, a juxtaposition of swagger and sensitivity, and room for that acrobatic voice to soar and strut. He wraps his scarves around a few Nashville tropes: Banjos, fiddles, ­mandolins and steel guitars populate several songs, including It Ain’t Easy, a clever ballad about life’s struggles, while the philosophical I Make My Own Sunshine would fit on a Kacey Musgraves album. Some tracks display very little Nashville influence: Hold On (Won’t Let Go) returns Tyler to an early influence, the Jeff Beck Group, but that won’t bother older fans or young country rockers. Only on Red, White & You does Tyler stoop to corny bro-country banalities. We’re All Somebody from Somewhere might not return Tyler to the top of the charts, but it suggests that he does at least still have a few tricks tucked into his velvet boots.

* Associated Press

Source: art & life

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