A guide to Valentine's flowers' meanings – in pictures

Flowers are the most typically given gift on Valentine’s Day. But do you know what the flowers you are giving or receiving mean? See our picture gallery to find out. newslide Carnation This popular flower is commonly considered an expression of love or fascination. It’s for this reason that the red and white versions are […]

Flowers are the most typically given gift on Valentine’s Day. But do you know what the flowers you are giving or receiving mean? See our picture gallery to find out.

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Carnation

This popular flower is commonly considered an expression of love or fascination. It’s for this reason that the red and white versions are so often found in bouquets. Over the years, the carnation has also become a popular choice for Mother’s Day, as the pink version is said to represent a mother’s love. The yellow carnation, however, is best avoided, because it expresses disdain, rejection and even disappointment. While many cut flowers don’t last beyond a week, carnations are known for their longevity.

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Iris

You really can’t go wrong with the iris. The flower, which means rainbow, comes in a variety of beautiful colours, including blue, purple, white, yellow and pink. The purple variety, best given after an achievement, is symbolic of wisdom, while the blue iris offers a message of faith and hope. If, however, you’re trying to profess your love to someone, it’s best to give them a handful of yellow irises, as this variety is a symbol of passion.

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Chrysanthemum

The chrysanthemum comes in a wide range of colours, the most popular being red, white and yellow. Though the red chrysanthemum, unsurprisingly, symbolises love, the white version is best given to your significant other, because it expresses loyalty. While the chrysanthemum is visually appealing – it looks lovely when used as a container plant on a patio – it can also be brewed into a relaxing tea.

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Freesia

We’ve never quite understood why Miranda from The Devil Wears Prada disliked freesias so much. The flower is mainly available in a pretty shade of yellow or white, which symbolises innocence, and is known for its strong yet pleasantly sweet floral scent. Its fragrance is so potent that it’s often used in perfumes, scented oils and bath products.

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Gardenia

The elegant-looking, fragrant gardenia symbolises sweetness, secret love and joy, making it an obvious choice for February 14. Though some might choose to add the flower to a bouquet arrangement, the gardenia also works beautifully on its own. Consider placing a bunch into a simple vase and using it as a centrepiece on your dining-room or coffee table.

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Rose

Though the rose has many meanings, and is perhaps the most obvious choice when expressing love, it also symbolises war and politics, represented by white and red varieties. The rose was also considered the most sacred flower in ancient Egypt, used as an offering for the goddess Isis, and sometimes placed in tombs. The flower comes in a variety of colours, including red, white, pink and yellow. Although it’s possible to grow a very dark version, a 100 per cent black rose doesn’t actually exist.

Source: art & life

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