3-D print your candy at Dubai Mall sweet shop

DUBAI // An stegosaurus, a turtle and a frog were among edible deigns made using state-of-the-art 3-D candy printing machines, to the delight of creative customers with a sweet tooth. Candylicious in Dubai Mall unveiled two 3-D food-printing machines on Mondau, the first time devices that print designs of gummy treats have been used in […]

DUBAI // An stegosaurus, a turtle and a frog were among edible deigns made using state-of-the-art 3-D candy printing machines, to the delight of creative customers with a sweet tooth.

Candylicious in Dubai Mall unveiled two 3-D food-printing machines on Mondau, the first time devices that print designs of gummy treats have been used in a shop anywhere in the world.

Children and adults watched excitedly as what moments earlier had been an image on an iPad was turned into tasty treats right before their eyes.

“The great thing about it is that the sky is the limit in terms of what the machines can print, so the customer is limited only by their imagination.”

The printers use special software that can transform any image, including photographs, into sweets. Customers can select from 20 images on an iPad, or create their own designs.

Didier Bloch, from France, was on holiday with his family and feeling creative, so he tried his hand at making his own sweets.

“I tried to make a heart but I don’t think my artistic skills were as good as I thought, so in the end I went for a more simple design,” he said, eventually opting for a heart design under his wife Stephanie’s name.

“It’s pretty amazing the way it makes the designs and I tried some of the samples and it’s just like a candy you would buy normally.”

It takes between three and five minutes for the design to be fully printed.

The candies are made from “gummy zummy”, a gel-like mix of pectin, fruit extract, glucose and citric acid.

“All the ingredients are natural, 100 per cent vegan, gluten free, GMO free, halal and meet safety requirements from the FSA [Food Standard Authority] and FDA [Food and Drug Administration],” said Ms Snover.

Leila Hamida, a Canadian mother of two, was pondering whether to have her children’s names written in the candy.

“It’s fascinating when you see all the different shapes that can be made by the machines,” she said.

“It’s definitely something that can make the personal touch for things but I think my children are a little too young to appreciate what exactly they will be chewing on.”

Even the A5 sized paper that the candy is printed on is edible.

“We are definitely seeing a move to more personalisation in confectionery and with the launch of 3D printed candy it’s taken to the next step,” said Rosantina Saraswati, confectionery retail head for Alabbar Enterprises, which owns Candylicious.

“We believe this will become as popular as some of the other items we have like the spun candy.”

The 3-D-printed sweets will cost Dh50 initially, with the regular price set at Dh65.

nhanif@thenational.ae

Source: uae news

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